Category Archives: Short Stories

YOUR GREATEST ACHIEVEMENT IN LIFE

“What do you consider one of your greatest achievements in life?”

As you reflect on your achievements in life and try to define one of your greatest, you must realize that achievements fall into one of two categories—earthly and spiritual. You must also understand that there is a relationship between the achievements in these two categories—one isn’t necessarily independent of the other. In fact, spiritual achievements often contribute directly to earthly achievements and enable us to reach success levels greater than had we performed them without any spiritual assistance. To deny that this relationship exists means you are willing to fall short of the maximum level of success possible for some of your greatest achievements on your journey through life.   

One of my greatest earthly achievements spans an era in life between ages fifteen to seventy. I have no doubts that my spiritual achievements helped make this “earthly” achievement much greater than otherwise possible.

The following short story explains the achievement.

++++++THE GIRL++++++

I attended an American Legion baseball game with some friends one night when I was fifteen-years old. My best friend, Billie, already had his driver’s license and owned a car. We piled into his car and he took us to the game.

We sat in the upper rows of the stands having a good time. I played baseball and loved the game, but the others I was with didn’t. Naturally, I was the only one actually trying to watch the game.

It was not long before a small group of young girls came in and sat a few rows in front of us. I hadn’t paid much attention to them because the game had already started. Billie was the lady’s man of our group and noticed the girls right away. I was too focused on the game and minding my own business, as usual.

I could hear my friends talking about the girls sitting in front of us, but I was trying to ignore what they were saying. I looked down a few times and saw the girls chattering also. They definitely had no idea what was happening on the baseball field. I wondered why in the world they even came to the game if they weren’t going to watch the action. I wondered the same thing about my friends.

I continued watching the game, but would glance down at the girls every now and then. I noticed one of them in particular. Then my eyes quickly went back to the game. The game was the reason I came along with my friends anyway. Unfortunately, I had no idea they would be on the prowl for babes at a baseball game.

One of the girls then turned and stared in our direction—the same girl I had noticed earlier. She was not looking at any of us, but at someone sitting behind us. When she turned, I looked directly into her eyes and saw how beautiful she was. She was very animated as she stood up looking and motioning to someone behind us. I could see she was very tall, trim, and without a doubt, very attractive.

I soon began to shift my eyes from the baseball field and looked at the girl more often. At that point I thought, “Heck with baseball, there’s an attractive girl in the stands sitting just eight feet from me.” I had no idea who she was or how old she was. I asked my friends if they knew her, but they didn’t.

I was too chicken to go talk to her. There were too many other girls around her and I was still too shy to make a move. Besides that, she was looking at the dudes behind us and didn’t know we even existed. The game ended and we left the stadium—without the girls.

Someone should have slapped me on the head for not trying to talk to her. I let the most beautiful girl I had ever seen get away without even meeting her. Smart and bold were certainly not things you could call me back in those days. I should have changed that shy-character trait much sooner in my life. I know I could have had a lot more fun while growing up had I done so.

Oh, I am sorry to ramble on. I know you’re not interested in the girl. I bet you just want to know who won the game and what the score was. Guess what—I don’t have a clue! I completely stopped watching the game in about the seventh inning when I focused my attention on the most beautiful girl in the world. Unfortunately, I let her get away without getting her name.

The bottom line of this tale is that my shyness and quiet nature were my own worst enemies. I really needed to work on them to improve my social skills. I had much goodness in my heart to offer others, but it was not evident. Being shy and quite is not always a bad thing, but there needs to be a good balance between also being outgoing and talkative. A blend of each is a perfect combination to have.

I finally began to make the necessary changes. That particular girl experience or lack thereof, was probably the catalyst that finally made me come to the realization that change was necessary. It was time for me to go forth into the world and mingle—make many friends and not limit myself to just a few. People were not going to bite my head off if I joined in, and I certainly had plenty of heart to give. I knew I could do it, but I had to try much harder.

Thank goodness, it didn’t take long for me to learn that making these adjustments would change my life for the better, and I am happy I did. Why, you ask—because “The Girl” I saw at that baseball game when I was fifteen-years old became my wife five years later. I was twenty and she was eighteen—just two kids in love with no idea of what the future would bring or where our journey through life would take us.

God had plans for us before we knew

Wedding Day 1969

The one thing both of us had in common was our greatest spiritual achievement—at a young age, we had accepted Jesus Christ as our Lord and Savior and had faith He would always be with us as we journeyed through life. I am pleased to say He has done that for many years. You see, we will be celebrating our fiftieth (50th) wedding anniversary in September 2019.

Like all marriages, life was not always easy for us, but the Lord got us through every obstacle we faced. We experienced good times, bad times, trials, tribulations, misfortunes, successes, and much happiness. However, through all those years, it was our faith and belief in God that sustained and strengthened us.

The Lord blessed us with two beautiful children and five grandchildren. My prayer for each of them is that they learn to have faith, trust, and believe in Jesus just as we do. I pray that they too have spiritual achievements that enhance their earthly achievements as they journey through life.

I am truly thankful for the many blessings I have received and know that “With God, All Things Are Possible.” I even wrote a novel about God’s grace that He gives to each of us. All anyone has to do is be willing to accept His blessing

Amazon author page: http://www.amazon.com/author/tomtatum

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FIGHT ON CHARLESTON ROAD

My StoryWorth question #8 of 50 was, “Have you ever gotten into a fight?” The short answer to the question is yes. The true short story below shares some “interesting” moments from my early childhood years and the life lesson I learned while living in a small house on Charleston Road.

FIGHT ON CHARLESTON ROAD

When I was four years old, I remember us moving from an apartment building on Ellis Avenue to a small house located outside the city limits on the Charleston Road (Hwy 21). It was a rural location. The house didn’t have any insulation in the floors, walls, or attic, so you could hear the wind howl through cracks in the walls and floor during those cold winter months. I remember being very cold during the winter and brutally hot during the summer months.

There was a big field with peach trees located behind the house with a fence on all sides of the orchard. I climbed over the fence many times to find small bottles buried in the ground. I’d bring them back to my yard and play with them. Why, I don’t really know. I guess it gave me something to do with my time. The bottles were nothing special, but maybe it was because of the colors—blue, brown, green, and clear bottles. I have no clue what they once contained or how old they were. I just remember seeing many of them scattered around. I would place them on top of the fence posts and throw rocks at them. I even managed to hit them often!

In retrospect, this may be a time in life when I started developing my ability to throw objects. This activity would later translate into my incredible accuracy throwing rocks, baseballs, or whatever. I‘ve never thought about it until I started writing this article. Day after day, I would throw rocks and hit the tiny bottles from a great distance. Unfortunately, the distance to a four year old may not have been “great” after all. For the moment, I will assume it was less than ten feet. At any rate, I learned how to hit them with consistency. I could look at a spot and hit it with whatever I threw. I spent many hours perfecting my ability and became very good at it.

Another thing I did constantly was throw rocks up into the air and hit them with a stick—any stick worked for me. I hit rocks for hours at a time. I don’t know how many sticks I destroyed by hitting rocks with them, but if I had a penny for every rock I hit, I would be a wealthy man today. It was a good thing to do when I was playing alone. Again, this probably helped me develop the skills necessary to hit baseballs a few years later by improving my hand-eye coordination. (Refer to my first article in this series, “ONE ROCK TOO MANY.

A boy who was my age or slightly older lived two houses down from me. I only knew him as H.L. and called him by that name. To this day, I do not know what the H.L. stood for. I guess it’s one of those great mysteries in life. We played together often doing the typical things like cowboys and Indians and hide-n-seek.

Trust me, I am not a violent person and have always tried to be fair to people, even to this day. I vividly remember my experience at three years old with Lang, but that’s another fighting story. However, that’s not to say I didn’t have my moments of confrontation with others.

One such instance happened when HL and I were at his house playing something, but I can’t remember what it was. Anyway, we managed to get into a fight about something. Trust me when I tell you, I didn’t start it. My daddy always told me he had better never catch me starting a fight with anyone and I remained true to his words. All I remember is that HL jumped on me and started punching me. He had me down on the ground and then grabbed a piece of steel pipe. As he raised his arm to hit me, I swung my fist with all my might and hit him in his mouth. There were several more blows thrown, which finally knocked him off me, and his lip started bleeding a bunch. He started crying and ran into his house. I was scared to death and ran home. I didn’t know what else to do or what was going to happen next.

Well, Daddy came home from work, and as was typical, asked me what I had been doing that day. Being more honest than George Washington and the cherry tree, I told him about my fight with HL.

His first question was, “who started the fight?” Again, I did not lie and told him that HL started it, but I didn’t know why. Daddy, all 6 feet 4 inches of him, stood tall in front of me, and I feared what my punishment was going to be. To my surprise, he reached out his huge hand, ruffled my hair, and told me he understood that I had to defend myself. He told me he was proud of me for ending the fight and not starting it.

However, he then told me I had to go back to HL’s house and apologize to him. I was now in total disbelief. Why did I have to go apologize to HL for what he had done to me? Daddy told me that even though HL had attacked me, I would be a bigger man if I went to tell him I was sorry for hitting him. He further said that HL was my friend and I would be playing with him in the future. I was glad my punishment was as light as it was. My daddy knew it was going to be hard enough for me to go back to HL’s house, and that was enough punishment.

Well, I guess I slowly meandered down to HL’s house, making sure I took the long route. I didn’t want to arrive at his house too soon and felt it would be better for things to cool down a bit longer. I finally summoned enough courage to knock on their front door. In a few moments, which felt like days, HL’s mother opened the door. I was scared but managed to ask her if I could talk to HL. She asked if I was the boy who had hit HL.

I didn’t know what she was planning to do to me, but my heart was racing a hundred miles an hour. I managed to say, “Yes, ma’am, and I’ve come to apologize to HL. She just smiled and called HL to the door. Boy, oh boy, was I glad she didn’t say anything else to me while we waited for HL.

In what seemed liked hours, HL finally came out on the porch holding a wet rag on his lip. I said, “I, I, I’m sorry for hitting you.”

He replied, “That’s OK,” and that’s about all he said. I guess he forgave me because we continued playing together, but not quite as much after that day. I’m not sure, but I bet his mother was standing where she could hear what we were saying to each other.

Daddy must have known what he was talking about because I did feel better about the whole thing after apologizing, but I still wonder to this day, why HL didn’t apologize to me. I guess that’s another one of life’s little secrets. I was the better man that summer day. I don’t know what would have happened between HL and me if I had not apologized.

Remember the wise words Dad said to me, “Son, don’t you ever start a fight, but don’t you ever walk away from one. When someone else starts one with you—stand your ground—be brave!”

+++++++ YOUR THOUGHTS +++++++

What would you do if someone jumped on you and then tried to hit your head with a piece of pipe?

Would you ever start a fight?

Would you apologize on your own, or wait until one of your parents told you to do so—as I did?

Do you think my dad punished me properly by making me apologize to the boy who tried to hit me? What was the life-lesson learned by this fighting experience?

Tom Tatum – Author

Amazon author page: http://www.amazon.com/author/tomtatum

Twitter: @TomTatumAuthor

LinkedIn: TomTatum1

Facebook page: Tom Tatum novels

Contact Tom by e-mail at OnGreenDiamonds@gmail.com

PERFECT GIFT FOR WRITERS

My daughter gave me a rather unique Father’s Day gift this year. The kind of gift you give someone who needs nothing and doesn’t give you any suggestions.

She went online and purchased the gift from StoryWorth. It’s a perfect gift for someone who enjoys writing. StoryWorth sends me a weekly email asking a question about my past. I’m supposed to answer the question with a short story. The length of the answer can be as long or short as I desire.

The package consists of 52 questions. Upon completion, StoryWorth will compile the questions and answers into a book of some kind—not sure of the final product.

However, the questions have done much more for me—they have made me reflect very deeply on my past, which has provided me with tons of additional thoughts I can use as plots for additional short stories—ideas that were beyond my wildest dreams. It’s has been like opening the floodgates to a vast reservoir of experiences and possibilities.

I’m not trying to give a plug for StoryWorth, but if you or someone you know loves to write, I suggest you check their website and see for yourself. It may be the perfect gift for yourself or someone on your list.

The following is the StoryWorth question and my response for week #18.

+++ Week #18 Question +++

 “What advice would you give your great grandchildren?”

The advice I would give my great grandchildren is the same advice I gave to my children, grandchildren, and anyone who is willing to listen. Those who actually follow the advice are more likely to achieve higher levels of success in life than those who choose to ignore them. My advice is included in my second novel titled, ON GREEN DIAMONDS: Pursuing a Dream.

To set the scene for you, the following excerpt from my novel is a conversation between Tyler and Gabe after Tyler’s first visit to church. They are discussing the need to follow the Ten Commandments. Gabe uses this moment to tell Tyler about the twenty-two “Rules to Live By” in order to achieve success in life, which were given to him as a young boy by his father.

Excerpt from  ON GREEN DIAMONDS

…Tyler came down to our house later that Sunday afternoon and we chatted about all sorts of things. We talked about his first visit to the church and then started discussing the Ten Commandments. I told him what they meant and how important they were to us.

Tyler said, “We sure don’t want to break those rules.”

“No, we don’t because they are very important. I also have some rules you should learn to live by.”

“What are your rules, Uncle Gabe?”

“My rules are about how to live your life. They were written on an old sheet of paper many years ago and were given to me. Now, I want to give them to you, but you must promise to keep them in a safe place. Tyler, this sheet of paper means more to me than you can imagine. I want you to read these rules every week and make sure you don’t ever forget them. If you try to follow these rules each day, you’ll be successful in life.”

I sat and read the rules to him.

RULES TO LIVE BY

  1. Spend some time alone each day in prayer asking God to help you be the person He wants you to be. You are in His hands and He is always there for you. All you have to do is ask for His help.
  1. Obey the Ten Commandments. When you falter, ask the Lord for forgiveness.
  1. Always give people more than they expect and do it cheerfully.
  1. Never laugh at another person’s dreams. People who don’t have dreams aren’t going anywhere.
  1. Remember that all great achievements involve great risk. Don’t be afraid to try something.
  1. When you lose, don’t lose the lesson. A loss isn’t the end of the world, but something to learn from and grow to be better the next time you try.
  1. Always give a hundred percent of yourself in everything you do. You’ll feel better about yourself, whether you win or lose. The joy comes from having given it your best shot.
  1. Set goals for yourself and give the effort it takes to succeed. You can be anything you want to be, but hard work is the key to success.
  1. Never judge people by their relatives. They may not like them either.
  1. Love your family and friends with all your heart. You might get hurt sometimes, but it’s the only way to live life completely.
  1. When disagreements arise, present your points fairly. Name calling and hitting won’t win the argument for you.
  1. Talk slowly, but think quickly. It isn’t always what you say, but how you say it.
  1. Life is full of ups and downs, so stay in control of your emotions. Never get too high or go too low.
  1. Always be willing to help others because there will come a day when you will need help also.
  1. Remember the three R’s: Respect for self, Respect for others and Responsibility for all your actions.
  1. When you realize you’ve made a mistake, take immediate steps to correct it and don’t be afraid to admit it. If you never make a mistake, then you aren’t trying to do anything.
  1. Don’t let a little dispute spoil a great friendship. A true friend is something special and worth holding on to.
  1. When you are talking to someone, always maintain eye contact. It is a sign of confidence and signals that you’re paying attention to what they are saying.
  1. Eat healthy foods. Your body needs all food groups to develop properly.
  1. Whenever you say, “I love you,” think before you say it and mean it. It isn’t to be used lightly.
  1. Always, always remember, a true friend is someone who reaches for your hand and touches your heart. You can be a true friend to someone else by touching their heart today.
  1. Read these rules every week. Only you can change you, so don’t wait. Start doing it today!

End of Excerpt

On a personal note, I believe in the Ten Commandments and try to obey them each day of my life. Unfortunately, like many others, I sometimes go astray and ask God to forgive me when I do—to help me walk on the right path.

Just as Gabe believed the twenty-two “Rules to Live By” helped him in life, I feel the same way. I try to follow these guidelines and know they played a major role in my successes in life.

If you want to be successful, and I hope you do, follow the advice given above—it will make a positive difference in your future.

Now, look at the first letter of each word in the title of my novel, ON GREEN DIAMONDS and you’ll see OGD. Do you notice anything significant about those three letters? If you rearrange them, they will spell the word GOD. Since I don’t believe in coincidences, maybe there’s a hidden message here—sometimes we need to rearrange our lives to make things work better for us on our path to achieve success.

I pray God blesses you each day as you travel on your path to success and understanding.

TIME FOR YOUR THOUGHTS

  • Do you know what the Ten Commandments are? Do you obey them?
  • Do you think the “Rules to Live By” could help you in life?
  • Are you going to use them to help you be the best you can be? I sure hope you will.
  • Have you read ON GREEN DIAMONDS? The novel references the twenty-two rules in real life situations throughout the story. Read it and you may enjoy it—you may even learn something about yourself. See the photo of the rules below.

END OF STORY

Tom Tatum – Author – 2019

Amazon author page: http://www.amazon.com/author/tomtatum

Twitter: @TomTatumAuthor

LinkedIn: TomTatum1

Facebook page: Tom Tatum novels

TWO BRAVE SENTINELS GUARDING MY FRONT DOOR

Two old rocking chairs sit motionless on my front porch. They are like two brave sentinels guarding my front door, but when folks come to visit me, they don’t even notice them sitting there. Those two old rockers don’t even exist as far as they are concerned, but they would likely think them out of place if they ever paused to notice them sitting there.

However, those two sentinels aren’t just old rocking chairs to me. You see, there was a time when those rockers were full of life, but that was many years ago when they guarded a different door. Cheerful voices and laughter filled the air around them as they rocked for hours back in those days.

Beneath the countless layers of paint applied to those two old rocking chairs through the years, you will find the golden beauty of a life once lived. The loving hands of a kind-gentle man made those rockers long before I was born, and if they could speak, they’d tell you stories that would make you smile, laugh, sigh, and maybe even shed a tear or two.

I have many fond memories of those rocking chairs, which is why I have them sitting there. It saddens me that no one notices or rocks in them anymore. I guess folks are just too busy these days and don’t have time to enjoy the simple things in life—like rocking and sharing special moments together. It seems folks are too busy running hither and yon or playing with electronic gadgets to consider enjoying such simple pleasures in life anymore.

The only time I ever see those two rocking chairs move these days is when the force of a gentle breeze kisses them softly as one would a newborn child. It is then those two old rockers seem to come alive again. I can even hear the sounds of soft voices and laughter floating on the invisible currents of air carrying the sweet aroma of gardenias I breathed long, long ago. It is during such precious moments that the floodgates of my mind open wide, releasing a river of memories as I envision the two of them sitting there.

You see, those two old rocking chairs mean the world to me. They belonged to my grandparents, Nene and Pop. When I close my eyes, I imagine Nene knitting as she slowly rocks back and forth while Pop puffs away on a corncob pipe he created with his rough, swollen hands. I don’t think Pop ever lit that old pipe though because I never saw any telltale smoke rising into the air, and the only scent I ever breathed came from Nene’s gardenias growing near their front porch. Maybe chewing on that old pipe was just Pop’s way of relaxing and remembering the glory days of his past—just as I am doing now.

I recall the many occasions when I snuggled quietly on Pop’s lap as we rocked for hours when I was a young boy. Sometimes we rocked well into the dark of night and counted the lightning bugs that came our way. Pop told me those flashing lights were angels saying hello to us. I believed him back then—I believe him even more so now.

However, most of our time together in that old rocking chair had Pop telling me stories about his childhood. I never knew if his stories were true, but it really didn’t matter to me. I just enjoyed hearing them and seeing the warm glow of a kind heart beaming from his eyes as he told each story. Every now and then, he would look down at me and flash a whimsical wink. That’s when I knew Pop had just shared a small piece of his soul with me, and only me. It made me feel warm inside and I always begged him to tell me more.

I will never forget the special moments that we shared—those precious moments in life when you feel so loved by someone that you want to shout out to the world to let everyone know how wonderful you feel.

We planned to celebrate my sixth birthday at Nene and Pop’s house that year. Nene was baking me a giant cake with her tender-loving hands, and I couldn’t wait to have my first sweet bite of heaven.

We were about to leave our house for my special celebration when the phone rang loudly that day. Mama answered and shouted, “Oh, no!” and started crying. She dropped the phone onto the floor and collapsed to her knees. I sensed something was wrong, but didn’t know what it could possibly be.

Daddy rushed to Mama’s side and helped her to her feet, but all she could say was, “Nene… Nene… Nene just…” Daddy held Mama in his arms, but she wouldn’t stop crying. Then Mama wrapped her arms around me and hugged me very tight. She didn’t say a word, but continued to cry—it made me sad to see her that way.

“Mama, you don’t have to cry because I love you this much,” as I spread my hands as far apart as I could. “See! Look Mama! See how much I love you!”

Mama finally paused for just a brief moment and squeezed me even tighter. Then she whispered softly in my ear, “We’re going to Pop’s house now, but we’ll have to wait to celebrate your sixth birthday another day. I’m so sorry, Taylor. Is that okay with you?”

I was disappointed, but I could sense I didn’t have a choice. I sadly replied, “Yes, ma’am—it’s okay. You don’t have to cry anymore. I’m your big boy now. I’ll take good care of you,” as I gently placed my hands on her tear-soaked cheeks.

“Yes, you are my big boy, and I knew you would understand,” as she continued wiping her tears. “Now, when we get to the farm, I want you to go to the barn and check on Pop’s chickens. You can feed them too, if you like. Will you do that for Pop and me?”

“Yes, ma’am— I will.” Again, I was confused, but I knew there were no other options for me. It was something I had to do.

When we arrived at the farm, I saw two police cars and an ambulance parked in front of Pop’s house with their lights flashing brightly. I remember thinking that it wasn’t a good sign to see them there and felt something must be terribly wrong. Mama told me to go to the barn and stay there until she came to get me. It was to be for just a little while.

I fed the chickens as Mama asked me to do, and then waited for what seemed to be a very long time. Then I saw Mama walking toward the barn, still wiping tears with each step she took. She knelt beside me, placed her hands on my shoulders, and said, “Taylor, I have something I must tell you and I want you to be my big boy when I do.”

Having no idea of the gravity of the moment, I replied, “Is it time for my birthday party? I’m ready to blow out the candles and eat the yummy cake Nene baked for me!”

After I said that, Mama started crying again, but her tears began flowing much more than before. It was the first time I had ever seen my mama cry so much. Her tears were falling like raindrops from the sky above. I thought I had done something wrong, but she wasn’t scolding me. Instead, she put her arms around me and pulled me firmly against her chest. She held me so tight I could feel her heart beating very fast.

She looked at me through red-swollen eyes and whispered softly, “Taylor, Nene—Nene went away today. She went to live with Jesus up in heaven.”

With the innocence of a child I replied, “When will she be coming back home, Mama? I don’t want Nene to miss my birthday party. She made a special cake for me!”

“Taylor, you know Nene loves you very much, but she won’t be coming back. She’s an angel and lives in heaven now, but I know she will still be watching you when we celebrate your special birthday.”

“But Nene didn’t tell me goodbye or sing happy birthday to me! She always tells me goodbye before she leaves. Mama, I want to go in the house to see Nene now! It’s my very special day! I’m six years old today! I’m your big boy now!”

Mama started crying even harder after I said that. She must have known I didn’t understand what she had told me. I pushed myself away from her grasp and started running toward Nene’s house. I heard Mama shouting my name, but I kept running as fast as my little legs could go. I was going to hear Nene sing happy birthday to me, but before I could get to the house, Daddy came down the steps and blocked my path.

I had never seen Daddy cry before, but I could see he was very upset that day. He had always told me big boys don’t cry. I was very confused by the tracks of tears I saw streaming down his cheeks because my daddy was, indeed, a very big boy. Big boys aren’t supposed to cry—Daddy told me so.

“Easy, Taylor! Now is not a good time for you to go inside Pop’s house. It will be better if you stay outside with your mama and me. Let’s go sit in the rocking chairs on the front porch for a few minutes.”

We walked in silence to the front porch and as I crawled up in Dad’s lap, I started crying as I said, “I want to see Nene! Daddy, please let me go see Nene!”

I fought hard to free myself, but Daddy was much too strong—I couldn’t break free.

“Did Mama tell you about Nene?” he asked.

“Yes, sir, but I want to go inside to see her. I want her to sing happy birthday to me because it’s my sixth birthday today. Mama said that it was my special day and if I made a wish, it would come true. My wish is to see Nene now. That’s all I wish for on my special day.”

Daddy picked me up and started walking toward the barn. When we got to Mama, she and Daddy hugged with me in the middle. We all stood there crying, but I didn’t really understand why until Daddy explained it to me again. That was the day I learned how it feels to lose someone you love very much. Yes, Nene went to heaven, but Mama told me that if I kept her in my heart, she would always be with me.

Well, I never did have that six-year-old birthday party. I guess Mama and Daddy were too busy with Nene’s funeral and taking care of Pop to celebrate it with me. They probably forgot about it, but I was okay with it because, party or no party, I was still a big boy—I was now six years old!

I remember going to Pop’s house every day over the next two weeks to make sure he was okay. I would sit on his lap in that old rocking chair, but he no longer told me stories after Nene went away. We just sat still with Pop staring off into the distance. It was as though he wasn’t there with me anymore. When I tried to talk to him, he just glanced down at me for a brief moment, but the warm glow he used to have in his eyes was no longer present. His eyes seemed so empty, as if his reasons for living were no longer there. However, each time a lightening bug flashed its light at us, I saw Pop smile. Then he would say, “Hello, Nene! I miss you so much! I’m looking forward to being by your side again—the way it used to be.”

Early into the third week after Nene went to heaven, Mama came to me crying once again. Based on my recent experience with Nene going to be with Jesus, I knew something was surely wrong. However, nothing could have prepared me for what she said to me that day.

“Taylor, I have some sad news to share with you, and I hope you will understand. Pop went to heaven to be with Nene today. Do you understand what I’m saying?”

I understood very well what she meant this time. We hugged and wiped away many more tears that day. I knew the weeks to follow were going to be very tough. I always thought I was the big boy Dad told me to be, but I cried a lot during those long weeks. Two people who I loved dearly were now up in heaven with Jesus, but I knew they were still watching over me because I was carrying them in my heart, as Mama told me I could do.

Mama and Daddy took care of selling the farm and most of Nene and Pop’s possessions because we didn’t have room to store them in our little house. The only things I asked to keep were the two old rocking chairs sitting on Nene and Pop’s front porch. Mama and Daddy finally agreed to let me have both of them, and I am very grateful they did.

When I got married many years later, the first things I moved to our new house were those two old rocking chairs. My wife thought they were hideous and wanted me to get rid of them. She said they were nothing but old pieces of wood—junk not worthy of having at our new house.

It was our first big argument, but I stood my ground. I refused to give in and placed those two old rockers on our front porch that day. She eventually accepted the fact I was keeping them, but she wanted to place them on the back porch because she didn’t want her friends to see them sitting there.

Eventually, I told her the story behind those two old rocking chairs, and they have been sitting on the front porch of every house we have lived in. Those two sentinels will always be guarding my front door, even though my wife will never fully understand how much they mean to me.

Sixty years have now slipped past since Nene and Pop went to be with Jesus, but each time I look at those two old rocking chairs, I imagine them still sitting there. Nene is knitting away and Pop is chewing on his handmade-corncob pipe.

On my birthday each year, I sit in Pop’s old rocking chair and pretend I’m celebrating my sixth birthday with him and Nene. I feel his presence and look into his eyes. What I see is that warm glow of his kind heart looking down at me once more.

Yes, Pop and Nene are still rocking together; the way it was meant to be. Now, when I see lightening bugs flashing their lights at me, I know it is Nene and Pop stopping by to say hello—Pop told me that long ago, and I know it to be true.

When I listen very carefully, I can even hear both of them singing happy sixth birthday to me. That thought warms my heart and always makes me smile. Yes, I just sit there for a few moments rocking with Nene and Pop—the way it used to be.

Just two old rocking chairs sitting motionless there, and yet, they are very full of life to me. Those two old rocking chairs hold fond memories of two people who will always have a special place in my heart. My Nene and Pop will always be rocking side-by-side on my front porch.

So, the next time you happen upon two old rocking chairs just sitting there, pause for just a moment and look beyond what your eyes can see. You may find your personal version of “Nene and Pop” sitting there, just the way it was meant to be. If not, think of all the stories those two old rocking chairs could tell you, if only they could speak.

May God bless you with many fond memories of those who now shine their lights upon you when they come to say hello—Pop told me that long ago, so I know it to be true.

Tom Tatum – Author – 2019

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